Tag: animals

Google Photos can now recognize the lovable faces of your cats and dogs

I wish this was one of the approximately 8,000 dog photos on my phone.
Image: Ruud Lauritsen/Kennel Club/REX/Shutterstock

Google knows that your phone holds untold gigabytes of snapshots of your favorite animal friends. So the search giant is making it even easier to group those pics all together.

The algorithm behind Google Photos will now be able to recognize your Very Good dogs and cats automatically, and will group the reams of photos you’ve taken of them just like it does with pics of people. Google announced the new functionality in a blog post, which is alone worth a read for the sheer number of paw puns pulled off in five short paragraphs. 

You’ll also be able to assign a label to each grouping of pet photos, so when you’re in need of an Instagram-worthy pupper shot, you can just search your photos by your dog’s name. 

Image: google

Google claims you’ll be able search your photos by breed, too, but the company acknowledged to BuzzFeed that the algorithm could have trouble differentiating between multiple animals within that parameter. You’ll also be able to search using 🐶  and 🐱 emoji through all of your animal images, whether they’re actually your own, or just the funny cat pics you download from the internet.  

The new search and organization features are only available for dogs and cats, though. If you love your horse or iguana or massive rideable python, you’re sadly out of luck. You’ll have to organize those pics yourself.       

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/10/16/google-photos-pet-search-features/

Koala escaping dogs gets a helping hand from farmer with a quad bike

While it’s better to leave them alone, sometimes our animal friends could use a helping hand.

Like this koala, who hitched a ride with a farmer on his quad bike after nearly ending up in a pond, frightened by some dogs, according to 7 News.

“I’m just giving him a ride back to the dairy, so he can dry off,” the farmer said in the video. Upon returning it ran up a tree, where hopefully it doesn’t have to encounter a bunch of pesky dogs ever again.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/10/15/koala-hitches-free-ride/

The rich dogs of Instagram: How popular pups earn big money on social media

Image: jon huang/tracy wong/katie sturino/mashable

Manny has achieved a lot for a six year old.

He’s a philanthropist and social media influencer with more than a million followers on Instagram, including Snoop Dogg and Martha Stewart. He’s appeared on Good Morning America and had his own booth at a music festival. He has numerous licensing and sponsorship deals with brands like Turtle Wax and Dremel.

Oh, and he’s a French bulldog.

Manny the Frenchie, as he’s known on Instagram, is not alone. He’s part of a growing breed of pet influencers that include other pedigree personalities like shih tzu Potato McTater and Cavalier King Charles spaniel Toast Meets World — they’re pictured above, doing their adorable thing.

Each of these doggos have achieved fame thanks to a distinctive personality trait.

Take Chloe the mini Frenchie, who is about half the size of a typical French bulldog. Her petite stature garnered her thousands of adoring fans, and eventually led to sponsorship deals in beauty and fashion. 

night night from an extra mini chlo nugget 🐣 #fbf

A post shared by Chloe The Mini Frenchie (@chloetheminifrenchie) on

Inspired by Chloe, her owner, Loni Edwards, has founded The Dog Agency — an agency that manages internet-famous pets. 

Potato’s famous costumes, meanwhile, included Hillary Clinton for Halloween, and have helped earn him notoriety. He has since appeared on the Today Show

Toast, a Cavalier King Charles spaniel rescued from a puppy mill, had to have all of her rotted teeth removed. This caused her tongue to flop out of her mouth, and the internet to fall in love with her.

my plan for the weekend…#carbs #FBF 🍞🍞🍞🍞🍞

A post shared by TOAST MEETS WORLD™ (@toastmeetsworld) on

Her ensuing fame has led to a book deal, merchandise, sponsorships, and even a fashion campaign. While her following largely grew organically without the help of management, she is now managed by Edwards’ Dog Agency. 

“I have a background in PR, and I started sending out pictures of her in little outfits to different magazines, and it took off,” said Toast’s owner, Katie Sturino. “It became a really fun, cool thing.”

Manny got the internet’s attention with his sink naps. 

Long weekend calls for long sink nap! 💤

A post shared by Manny The Frenchie (@manny_the_frenchie) on

“That’s really what started to go viral,” said Manny’s owner, Jon Huang. “From there, celebrities started following up with him, giving him shout-outs. He got followed by the cast members from Glee, and then local media started picking him up.”

The corporate sponsorships

The money pet influencers can make from sponsorships varies based on follower count, but it can be a cash cow. Pets with a comparable number of followers to Manny can make anywhere from $10,000 to $15,000 per sponsored post, according to Edwards.

“Of course there’s many variables that go into it — the rates pets can make per post depend on the following, the engagement, and what’s involved in the campaign,” Edwards said. “But generally those with a couple hundred thousand followers are making $3,000 to $5,000 per piece of sponsored content, while those in the millions make $10,000 to $15,000.”

Those figures are comparable to human rates; Forbes reported in April that an influencer with 100,000 followers can expect around $5,000 per post.

Hey girl, I know frenchies fart alot, but don’t worry I got us covered! 💨😉 . . @turtlewax #turtlewax #promoted #Shinesquad

A post shared by Manny The Frenchie (@manny_the_frenchie) on

While one might reasonably expect these pet influencers to promote products for animals, that’s not usually the case. Toast is best known as a fashion model; she did the entire look-book for Karen Walker’s Spring 2015 eyewear campaign and, as a result, was featured on posters all around the world. 

Though it might seem odd that a fashion brand would choose a dog to model its new merchandise, Edwards said it actually makes good sense.

“A lot of the brands we work with are human brands as opposed to pet brands,” she said of her agency. “Brands are seeing the value that pet influencers are providing; they have higher engagement levels, they’re relatable across all demographics, and they offer all the traditional benefits of influencer marketing.”

Modeling hasn’t been Toast’s only foray into the human world. She also has brand deals with Stainmaster, Febreze, and Swiffer. Chloe also has her own distinct Instagram persona, focussing on topics that might not seem typical for an animal.

“Travel, fashion, and food,” Edwards said. “Chloe’s content tends to revolve around those themes, and the brands she partners with are based on those themes as well.”

photoshoot ready thanks to @UrbanDecayCosmetics 💄💁🏼 #UrbanDecay is cruelty-free & doesn’t test on animals. how could anyone? #ad

A post shared by Chloe The Mini Frenchie (@chloetheminifrenchie) on

Manny, unlike other famous pets with such large followings, is managed by his owner Huang.

“We try to partner exclusively and strategically with partners who are organic to us, and who kind of share our mission,” Huang said. Manny’s partners are based in both the human and pet worlds, and range from Halo organic pet food to power tool brand Dremel, which makes a special nail filing attachment.

“We take all of Manny’s photos,” Huang said, explaining how the process works. “We write all the captions for the organic posts. If it’s campaign related, we write them in Manny’s voice and if the partner wants to change or edit, then they can choose to.”

Corporate partnerships and appearances aren’t the only ways these pets make money. Toast and Manny both have book deals and merchandise available in their online stores. Manny even did a campaign with American Apparel — his first partnership. 

Philanthro-pups

Of course, it’s not all take, take, take. The humans behind the Insta pets generally use the social media platforms to give back where possible. 

“Manny is known as the most philanthropic pet celebrity in the world,”Huang says. It’s a grand claim, but he insists that they’ve donated some $105,000 to various charitable causes. The proceeds from Manny’s merchandise go to animal rescue organizations and the pair purchased a new van for an animal shelter. Manny also visited a cystic fibrosis patient whose only wish was apparently to meet the dog.

Huang plans to launch Manny’s non-profit foundation before the end of the year, which will benefit whatever causes “touch [his] heart.”

“We visit a lot of retirement homes; Manny’s training to visit kids now.”

“We visit a lot of retirement homes; Manny’s training to visit kids now,” Huang continued. “We want to work with kids with disabilities and fighting cancer. We want to cheer them up with Manny.” 

According to Chloe’s website, she has used her celebrity to raise money for the Humane Society of NY, mostly through fashion-based collaborations.

“[Chloe] recently collaborated with luxury scarf line Donni Charm to create dog scarves, as well as worked with a factory in NYC to create Pawtty Bags, essentially little dog purses to hold poop bags,” her website states. All proceeds went to the Humane Society. 

For Sturino, the most important use of Toast’s platform is encouraging dog adoption. She began the account not to seek fame, but because she felt more people needed to be aware of rescue dogs like Toast. 

“She just had a very special energy — she just did,” Sturino said. “People were always very drawn to her.”

In addition to monetary donations to the humane society, she frequently uses Toast’s account to advocate for the removal of pet stores from New York City. 

The future for Insta-pups

The Instagram pet community has ballooned in recent years, with newer pet owners seeing the mass appeal enjoyed by famous animals. 

“I think that there was a first wave of Instagram famous dogs,” Sturino said. “And now that world has bloated so much.”

Take Potato, whose owner Tracy Wong started his account after following San Francisco’s Daily Dougie. “I became obsessed [with Dougie],” Wong said. “I said, ‘When I have a dog, he’s totally gonna be Instagram famous.’ It started as a joke, and it was just me following other dogs on Instagram and getting a lot of joy out of that; we never thought it would escalate to the point it’s at now.” 

Draw me like one of your #FrenchFries 🍟 Happy #NationalFrenchFryDay! What’s your favorite way to eat #Fries? 😉 #CurlyFries #Ketchup #Mayo 😍

A post shared by 👻🐤Potato_McTater | Shih Tzu (@potato_mctater) on

Much like any niche community, Wong said, there’s always a bit of drama. Sturino agreed. “It’s like the Toddlers and Tiaras of dogs,” she joked. 

The issues stem from owners of rescue dogs versus those of dogs who were bought from a store or breeder. “A lot of store bought dogs on Instagram hide a little behind dog rescue, acting like they didn’t buy a dog,” Sturino said.

The ASPCA works closely with a lot of these canine celebs. “Instagram pet celebrities have a large influence on their fans, which is why the ASPCA often collaborates with them to spread awareness about key animal welfare issues including the importance of pet adoption, how to end puppy mills, and the cruelty of dog fighting, said Olivia Melikhov, ASPCA director of social media strategy.

Lil Bub, for example, does a great job raising awareness about special needs pets, while Marnie the Dog helps raise visibility about the value of senior pet adoption. So while simply being famous on Instagram is a celebration of pets in general, we feel the true potential impact of these wonderful animals is their ability to advocate for fellow dogs and cats in need and at risk.”

All of the owners said their pets’ fans made running the accounts a fulfilling experience. 

“Potato’s fans are the sweetest people in the world,” Wong said. “You see this goofy-looking, fluffy dog — just his existence makes us happy. It’s cool we get to share that with everyone else.”

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/08/26/instagram-famous-pets-money/

Good Samaritans in Houston haul 21 dogs to safety in a single boat

After Hurricane Harvey, a group of good Samaritans came to the rescue of dozens of good dogs.

Houston resident Betty Walter found herself stranded in floodwaters in the wake of the storm. She was also sheltering 21 dogs (some of which belonged to her neighbors) and wasn’t sure how they would all get to safety.

Luckily, the dog rescue crew came along. They loaded all 21 dogs on the boat — Walter walked alongside — and hauled everyone away.

“I was worried there was too many dogs on the boat and it would tipped [sic] over,” Walter wrote in a Facebook post. “I told them I would stay behind and for them to make 2 trips. They said NO we are taking all and you. We had 21 dogs on this boat.”

To get out, the humans had to slog through water higher than her head, she added.

Eventually, Walter and all 21 took shelter at a crew member’s house in nearby Kemah, Texas. At the time of writing, they were all doing fine.

WATCH: Smiling rescued donkey is so happy to be back on solid ground

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/08/29/hurricane-harvey-dog-boat-rescue/

Sad BBC news reporter very unhappily presents footage of happy, surfing dogs

It’s silly season in the UK, which means the media is abundant with funny and frivolous stories to make up for the summer’s slow news and one reporter in particular is just completely over it.

BBC News presenter Simon McCoy is so over it in fact that not even a story about the World Dog Surfing Championship can get a smile out of him. He even prefaces the segment with, “Just bear in mind, it is August,” setting up the clip with as much silly season enthusiasm as he can muster.

We didn’t think it was possible to be this unhappy while reporting on surfing pups, but sheesh, were we wrong. Is he talking about pups or the stock market?

His exasperated sighs can be heard over clips of the event a stark juxtaposition to the footage of happy doggies splashing carelessly in the waves. This man has had it with all the silliness.

Maybe he’s seen one too many dogs surf and now he’s unimpressed. Perhaps he had higher aspirations to only report on cats and now he’s stuck doing dog stories.

Dogs surfing = BORING. Tough break, dude.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/08/07/bbc-presenter-unhappily-presents-surfing-dogs/

We Rate Dogs shuts down man claiming not all dogs are good

If you’re going to talk shit about dogs on Twitter, be aware that you are at serious risk of online abuse.

We Rate Dogs, as name suggests, is a Twitter account that “rates” dogs, except the scoring is slightly skewed because all dogs are good dogs. Duh.

If you aren’t following the account yet, you’re missing out on some top-notch, 13/10 pup action. Check out some of these puppers:

Fighting for the all the good doggos around the world, the account will occasionally shut down anyone who tries to say that bad dogs exist. If you’re new to the world of dog memes, it’s a grand old time.

On Wednesday, popular Twitter person and self-described “normal dude” Brandon Zaboklicki a.k.a sexualjumanji, made the mistake of making the false claim that there are some bad dogs in the world.

We Rate Dogs saw, and asked the man to rethink his stance on bad dogs. He did.

The original tweet has since been deleted, but the regret process is still very much intact. Given that We Rate Dogs has 2.69 million dog-loving followers, it’s safe to say he endured the full wrath of dog Twitter.

When reached for comment, Zaboklicki confirmed his recent revelation.

“I think all dogs are good,” he wrote via DM.

With more than 92,000 followers, Zaboklicki is no stranger to some attention on the site, but he described his experience of feeling the wrath of dog Twitter as a “wild night.”

We Rate Dogs is basically the mafia for dog memes.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/07/13/we-rate-dogs-bad-dogs-shut-down/

These photos of cheetahs and dogs playing will melt your freezing cold heart

It’s common knowledge that everyone on this planet or everyone who counts, at least loves dogs.

They’re fun to be around. They’re a comforting presence. Just one look at their cheerfully lolling tongues and dopey, wagging tails is enough to make you think the world might not be such a terrible place after all.

Well cheetahs and human beings may not have a lot in common, but this is something they do have.

Thanks to a gloriously viral tweet from Andy Stardust, the internet has recently discovered that cheetahs and dogs actually make great best friends.

According to a follow-up tweet from Stardust, pairing “support dogs” with nervous cheetahs is actually not at all uncommon in the States (Mashable has reached out to ZSL London Zoo with some questions about this practice, and we will update this article if we receive a response).

Needless to say, the internet was all for it.

The practice isn’t just restricted to cheetahs, either.

If those photos and gifs haven’t immediately been bumped into your top five most adorable things ever, then it’s possible you need to take a look at yourself.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/28/nervous-cheetahs-support-dogs-friends/

Where 120 people failed, delicious sausages succeeded in reuniting lost dogs

Miniature schnauzers Charlie and Theo were lost for four days in Cumbria, England until the smell of sizzling sausages brought them back, Caters reports.

Image: Jim Davis/Caters News

Liz and Graham Hampson were distressed when their fuzzy furbabies went missing on June 16, so they went all out to get their pups back.

The couple’s rescue campaign involved friends, family, mountain rescue teams, and even two drones. Overall, more than 120 people helped in the endeavor.

Over 90 hours later, the dogs still weren’t found. So the family “decided to barbecue some sausages near the spot where they vanished and shouted the dogs names.”

Image: Jim Davis/Caters News

The sausage campaign was successful. Charlie and Theo soon came running through the trees, happily reunited with their family. And also the sausages.

Glad these dogs were able to meat again.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/28/lost-dogs-sausage/

Molly and Max's Dogs © 2016 Frontier Theme