Tag: Culture

Sad BBC news reporter very unhappily presents footage of happy, surfing dogs

It’s silly season in the UK, which means the media is abundant with funny and frivolous stories to make up for the summer’s slow news and one reporter in particular is just completely over it.

BBC News presenter Simon McCoy is so over it in fact that not even a story about the World Dog Surfing Championship can get a smile out of him. He even prefaces the segment with, “Just bear in mind, it is August,” setting up the clip with as much silly season enthusiasm as he can muster.

We didn’t think it was possible to be this unhappy while reporting on surfing pups, but sheesh, were we wrong. Is he talking about pups or the stock market?

His exasperated sighs can be heard over clips of the event a stark juxtaposition to the footage of happy doggies splashing carelessly in the waves. This man has had it with all the silliness.

Maybe he’s seen one too many dogs surf and now he’s unimpressed. Perhaps he had higher aspirations to only report on cats and now he’s stuck doing dog stories.

Dogs surfing = BORING. Tough break, dude.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/08/07/bbc-presenter-unhappily-presents-surfing-dogs/

We Rate Dogs shuts down man claiming not all dogs are good

If you’re going to talk shit about dogs on Twitter, be aware that you are at serious risk of online abuse.

We Rate Dogs, as name suggests, is a Twitter account that “rates” dogs, except the scoring is slightly skewed because all dogs are good dogs. Duh.

If you aren’t following the account yet, you’re missing out on some top-notch, 13/10 pup action. Check out some of these puppers:

Fighting for the all the good doggos around the world, the account will occasionally shut down anyone who tries to say that bad dogs exist. If you’re new to the world of dog memes, it’s a grand old time.

On Wednesday, popular Twitter person and self-described “normal dude” Brandon Zaboklicki a.k.a sexualjumanji, made the mistake of making the false claim that there are some bad dogs in the world.

We Rate Dogs saw, and asked the man to rethink his stance on bad dogs. He did.

The original tweet has since been deleted, but the regret process is still very much intact. Given that We Rate Dogs has 2.69 million dog-loving followers, it’s safe to say he endured the full wrath of dog Twitter.

When reached for comment, Zaboklicki confirmed his recent revelation.

“I think all dogs are good,” he wrote via DM.

With more than 92,000 followers, Zaboklicki is no stranger to some attention on the site, but he described his experience of feeling the wrath of dog Twitter as a “wild night.”

We Rate Dogs is basically the mafia for dog memes.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/07/13/we-rate-dogs-bad-dogs-shut-down/

These photos of cheetahs and dogs playing will melt your freezing cold heart

It’s common knowledge that everyone on this planet or everyone who counts, at least loves dogs.

They’re fun to be around. They’re a comforting presence. Just one look at their cheerfully lolling tongues and dopey, wagging tails is enough to make you think the world might not be such a terrible place after all.

Well cheetahs and human beings may not have a lot in common, but this is something they do have.

Thanks to a gloriously viral tweet from Andy Stardust, the internet has recently discovered that cheetahs and dogs actually make great best friends.

According to a follow-up tweet from Stardust, pairing “support dogs” with nervous cheetahs is actually not at all uncommon in the States (Mashable has reached out to ZSL London Zoo with some questions about this practice, and we will update this article if we receive a response).

Needless to say, the internet was all for it.

The practice isn’t just restricted to cheetahs, either.

If those photos and gifs haven’t immediately been bumped into your top five most adorable things ever, then it’s possible you need to take a look at yourself.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/28/nervous-cheetahs-support-dogs-friends/

Where 120 people failed, delicious sausages succeeded in reuniting lost dogs

Miniature schnauzers Charlie and Theo were lost for four days in Cumbria, England until the smell of sizzling sausages brought them back, Caters reports.

Image: Jim Davis/Caters News

Liz and Graham Hampson were distressed when their fuzzy furbabies went missing on June 16, so they went all out to get their pups back.

The couple’s rescue campaign involved friends, family, mountain rescue teams, and even two drones. Overall, more than 120 people helped in the endeavor.

Over 90 hours later, the dogs still weren’t found. So the family “decided to barbecue some sausages near the spot where they vanished and shouted the dogs names.”

Image: Jim Davis/Caters News

The sausage campaign was successful. Charlie and Theo soon came running through the trees, happily reunited with their family. And also the sausages.

Glad these dogs were able to meat again.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/28/lost-dogs-sausage/

Dogs can’t decide if they like fidget spinners or not

Image: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Dogs, like all of us, don’t know what to make of fidget spinners, and can’t wait for them to finally go away. Videos of people engaging their dogs with fidget spinners are rapidly becoming the latest trend, for better or worse.

Googling “fidget spinner dog” reveals a bounty of great content, and if there’s one overarching takeaway, it’s that dogs really have no remote idea what to make of them.

Fidget spinner on dog mouth, lol! #fidgetspinner #fidget #fidgetcube

A post shared by Aimcig-Hardware Manufacturer (@ben_huang_vapor) on

Dachshund fidget spinner master

A post shared by Milli & Mango (@millithemagnificent) on

All great, but if there’s one clear winner, it’s obviously this:

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/12/dogs-with-fidget-spinners/

NYC subway riders are finding creative ways to get their dogs on board

A new NYC transit rule went into effect last October, which bans dogs from riding the subway unless they fit inside a “container.”

What the powers that be didn’t realize, though, is just how many dogs fit inside containers. In fact, judging by these photos … it seems like most dogs fit inside bags.

Another one for my dog in a bag in a #NYC subway series.

A post shared by S Rai (@sonahere) on

Let’s hope that, for the sake of these good boys and girls, no one ever thinks to implement a size restriction.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/07/nyc-subway-dogs-in-bags/

13 dogs with jobs are further proof that humans owe a lot to this exceptional species.

We all know dogs are (hu)man’s best friend.

Our pets keep us company, take us on adventures, and teach us about unconditional love. In return, we give them food and shelter and train them to do silly things.

But service and working dogs take their relationship with humans a step further these pups are trained with skills that can save lives. Did you know that some dogs can detect allergens in your food? And get help in an emergency situation?

Here are 13 impressive things service and working dogs can be trained to do that help save lives:

1. Smell blood sugar levels.

When blood sugar levels change, the human body releases chemicals that dogs can smell. Diabetic-alert dogs are trained to smell when their partner’s blood sugar level is dangerously off and to let them know that action is needed to get those levels back in the safe zone.

Luke, a boy with Type 1 diabetes, has a diabetic-alert dog named Jedi,who alerted him to low glucose levels:

Good low Jedi. #diabeticalertdog

A post shared by Luke and Jedi (@lukeandjedi) on

2. Find a person buried in an avalanche.

If you’re ever caught in an avalanche, having a dog on the search-and-rescue team could drastically increase your chances of survival. An avalanche dog can search 2.5 acres in 30 minutes. (It would take a team of humans up to four hours to cover the same ground.) These skilled canines sniff the snow for a pool of human scent; when they find it, they alert their handler and start digging.

Keena the avalanche pup is training in Colorado:

SEARCH! #puppyintraining #avydog #drive #rocket #chickenhawk #imgoingtogetyou @ruffwear @avyinstitute @grandtargheeresort

A post shared by Keena The Avalanche Pup (@keenatheavalanchepup) on

3. Alert you to the sound of a fire alarm.

Hearing dogs are trained to assist people who are deaf or hard of hearing. These pups alert their partners to a wide variety of sounds: a door knock, a spoken name, an alarm clock, a fire alarm, and more.

Like any service dog, hearing dogs require years of committed training to perform their tasks. But even these furballs like Sophie the collie/lab mix need a little down time!

4. Support someone who has PTSD.

A post-traumatic stress disorder service dog can detect early signs of anxiety then nudge, paw, lick, and generally distract their human from potential triggers in the environment, giving their partner a chance to regain control.

5. Detect changes in blood pressure.

When a person’s blood pressure or heartbeat changes rapidly, a cardiac-alert dog can warn the person of this danger. Without this signal, people with conditions like dysautonomia risk passing out (among many other complications) due to severe blood pressure changes.

Here, medical-alert dog Blaine cuddles with his handler:

Don’t know what I would do without him

A post shared by Nicole & Blaine Reynolds (@stilllifewithblaine) on

6. Get help in an emergency situation.

Many service dogs can be trained to summon help in an emergency situation, whether it’s finding another person to assist their human or using a special phone to call 911.

7. Protect people during seizures.

Some seizure dogs are trained to alert their handler before a seizure (similar to a cardiac-alert dog) while others respond a certain way during or after a seizure such as barking for help, moving away certain objects that could be dangerous, or protecting their human as they collapse.

This adorable mug belongs to Riley, a seizure-alert and response dog:

8. Deliver medical supplies to injured soldiers.

During World War I, “mercy dogs” were trained to search a battlefield for wounded soldiers. The dogs carried packs with medical supplies that soldiers could use to treat their own injuries. Some dogs were trained to retrieve a handler to assist the injured soldier.

Below, Lt. Col. Edwin H. Richardson poses with Red Cross war dogs during World War I:

9. Detect potential allergens in food.

Some people don’t like peanuts. Some people go into anaphylactic shock and risk serious health complications or even death if they touch peanuts.

For the latter, allergy detection dogs can be trained to sniff out allergens like peanuts, milk, soy, latex, or other substances. The pup can alert their human of the danger or even block the person from going near the allergen.

10. Support someone with autism.

Autism service dogs provide crucial companionship for their partners, and some are trained to alert and respond to certain triggers. For example, if a human has trouble with anxiety or sensory processing, their pup can provide calming comfort by lying on top of them a technique called “deep pressure therapy.”

Ultron, an autism service dog in training, helps his partner Axton navigate the world more confidently and independently:

They make a great team! #servicedog #autismservicedog #ateamforever #greatdaneservicedog #aboyandhisdog #skyzone #greatdane

A post shared by Journey of Ultron and Axton (@journeyofultronandaxton) on

11. Guide a person who is visually impaired.

Guide dogs are loyal pups who are trained to help those who are blind or visually impaired physically navigate the world. Humans have been training dogs for this purpose for centuries, and the practice of dogs helping guide people is actually so old that we’ll never really know how or when it began.

This little guide dog in training, Smudge, isn’t quite big enough for her harness yet:

12. Sniff out explosives.

Bomb-sniffing dogs alert their handler if they smell even a small amount of explosives. These dogs are common in the military, but they also save lives working with organizations like the United Nations Mine Action Service. UNMAS uses mine detection dogs to de-mine conflict-heavy places, including Colombia and Sudan.

13. Provide physical balance and support.

Brace and mobility service dogs help their humans physically get aroundby opening doors, picking things up off the ground, helping their partners up from a fall, providing counterbalancing or bracing while walking, and more.

Here you can clearly see service dog Kaline’s mobility harness:

People tend to talk about how fortunate dogs are to have devoted humans looking out for them. We spend years training them and thousands of dollars on food, vet visits, cute outfits (don’t deny it), and treats the list goes on.

But as lucky as dogs are to have us, we’re infinitely more lucky to have them sticking with us every step of the way.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/13-dogs-with-jobs-are-further-proof-that-humans-owe-a-lot-to-this-exceptional-species

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